Creative Writing Activities For Teachers

 

creative writing activities for adults

Where in there was your scheduled writing time? If writing is your therapy or your passion, make an effort to include it on your daily list. Take a moment for yourself and do some creative writing activities to help put your thoughts on paper and get your creativity flowing. Creative Writing Activities and Games Here's a collection of creative writing activities that can be used in a classroom or by a writing group. These activities are suitable for a wide range of ages, from middle school to adult. 1) Free-writing: Free-writing is good as a warm-up exercise and as a strategy for overcoming fear or writer's block. Why This Creative Writing Exercise Is Genius. When you finish—after ten lines or a hundred— read your poem out loud. You’ll probably be surprised at how good it is! That’s why this exercise is so perfect. Because when you try to write badly, you free up your creativity .


11 Creative Writing Exercises (Write and improve your skills)


These creative writing activities or exercises can be used in a classroom or workshop situation. Some of them may be adapted for use as online exercises. I have grouped the creative writing activities according to the elements of fiction they address, creative writing activities for adults. I hope the ideas here will also be of use to writers looking for warm-up exercises or story starters.

The world had turned gray. Using the poem of their choice for inspiration, have group members create a character, a setting, creative writing activities for adults, a situation, and a character goal, from the poem and write a brief short story. What sort of character do these two words suggest, in what setting, and what situation? Maybe a person sitting hunched at the edge of a pond, watching his or her reflection in the water?

What might a character in this setting and situation want more than anything else? What obstacles might he or she have to overcome to attain that goal?

With these components or ones inspired by a more conventional poem, individuals may construct a story. Imagine two characters.

One wants to do something and the other does not. Or one wants something the other has. Write a dialog between these two characters, where one character wants to persuade the other, and the other is determined not to give in. This will create extrinsic tension. To illustrate this, pair individuals off and provide each pair with a subject of debate. Whichever side one takes, the other's must take the opposing view. Have each pair politely and respectfully debate their subject for five or ten minutes.

When the time is up, have each individual transcribe the dialog as closely as possible. When they have finished, have both individuals read their transcriptions aloud to see how the accounts differ. If you have time for a "Part II" to this exercise, have each pair revise their dialogue set to include a couple of "beats" or the the "action tags" that show the small actions characters take as they engage in dialogue.

During this creative writing activity, encourage group members to ask questions that reveal character, rather than only questions about appearance. For example, someone might ask "How does your character express anger? The answers may be kept short or, if you have time, answers may explain the "why" of the response, such as "My creative writing activities for adults suppresses his anger because when he was a teenager, in a fit of rage, he slammed the car door as hard as he could and caught his dog in the creative writing activities for adults as the dog tried to jump out after him.

This broke his dog's spine, and the animal had to be put to sleep. Ever since, the character avoids confrontation, and when faced with the anger of another turns pale and stutters. The groups should discuss this for several minutes and then choose a spokesperson to present the group decision to the class with an explanation of why they chose the name they did.

Discuss the appropriate use of dramatization and narrative summary, and provide students with an example of each. Then present individuals or small groups with a statement that inappropriately "tells," such as Jane was angry with her father. Have them first change the telling into active showing by writing a passage that dramatizes the statement. For example: Jane did what she always did when she was angry with her father.

She turned away from him and tried to get her brother on-side by rolling her eyes. Except this time, her brother didn't smile or say something funny or reassure her in any way. He just looked down at his plate as if she had done nothing at all. When everyone has finished, have an individual from each group read the two passages aloud to the entire class or workshop and ask the group if they would change anything about either example.

Collect the images, shuffle them and pass them out, so that no one has the image he or she brought. Now have each person write a passage that describes the subject or event shown in the photo and what it means. Have each individual read his work aloud. Following this, ask the owner of the image to explain what the image meant to him or her. The brook in the gully behind the garden, a trembling trickle most of the time, was tonight a loud torrent that tumbled over itself in its avid truckling to gravity, as it carried through corridors of creative writing activities for adults and spruce last year's leaves, and some leafless twigs, and a brand-new, unwanted soccer ball that had recently rolled into the water from the sloping lawn after Pnin disposed of it by defenestration.

Distribute a short story to everyone in the group and have them read it. Ask them to make an A-Z list of appealing words from the story, one word for each letter of the alphabet, if possible.

When everyone has finished, suggest a starting word, and have someone choose a word from his or her list that begins with the final letter of your original word. Have each person in turn add a word that begins with the final letter of the word that came before it, and say what they liked about the word they chose. Alternatively, have them create a piece of flash fiction one word at a time, with each student contributing where possible.

Have students go on for as long as they are able X,Y, Z can get a little trickyand then if you like, have them work in the reverse direction. Or ask them to use the idea, setting, creative writing activities for adults, or character that resulted to write a short piece of fiction. Such limited constraints will sometimes yield fresh and surprising concepts or descriptions.

They could then explain to the others why the simile does not work. Close Help. Entering your story is easy to do. Just type Your story will appear on a Web page exactly the way you enter it here, creative writing activities for adults, with light editing if necessary. You can wrap a word in square brackets to make it appear bold. For example [my story] would show as my story on the Web page containing your story. TIP: Since most people scan Web pages, include your best thoughts in your first paragraph.

Do you have a picture to add? Click the button and find it on your computer. Then select it. Click here to upload more images optional. Your Name. Your Location. I am at least 16 years of age. I understand and accept the privacy policy. I understand that you will display my submission on your website. You can preview and edit on the next page. While on your walk snap photographs of the scenery, wildlife, or people. Later, write about your walk. Have a group of five to 10 form a circle.

Start by chosing a well-known character. Cartoon characters are ideal. Then, choose the most boring one. Cut the paper into small squares so all creative writing activities for adults ideas are into little sheets.

Search this site:. It's a clever little poem that has to be reproduced visually for its full effect. For creative writing activities for adults He swung around to glare at her. Then have them summarize the same passage in an appropriately vivid way. Write it here. Enter Your Title We may edit this.

Share Your Idea! Upload Pictures or Graphics optional [? Ground rules: No talking to one another No …. Try this with a class you are comfortable …, creative writing activities for adults. Describe everything you photographed …, creative writing activities for adults. Students use magazines to make connections between …. Take a small beach ball and have the ball passed …, creative writing activities for adults.

It's quite simple; imagine …. Then, without …. Now write a few paragraphs about that creative writing activities for adults. Close Help Entering your story is easy to do. Close Help Do you have a picture to add?

 

Creative Writing Activities and Games

 

creative writing activities for adults

 

Creative Writing Activities and Games Here's a collection of creative writing activities that can be used in a classroom or by a writing group. These activities are suitable for a wide range of ages, from middle school to adult. 1) Free-writing: Free-writing is good as a warm-up exercise and as a strategy for overcoming fear or writer's block. Creative Writing Activities For Teachers. These creative writing activities or exercises can be used in a classroom or workshop situation. Some of them may be adapted for use as online exercises. I have grouped the creative writing activities according to the elements of fiction they address. Creative Writing Prompts. These creative writing worksheets can can be used both in class or as weekly homework assignments. We are always looking for more contributions so if you have an idea please send it to us. Eventually all of the story starters will be turned into worksheets and posted here.